A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY EXAMINING THE IMPACT OF AGEING ON THE PSYCHOSOCIAL EXPERIENCES OF PATIENTS WITH LYMPHOMA
Author(s): ,
Natalie Dren
Affiliations:
Research,Lymphoma Coalition,Mississauga,Canada
,
Olufunmilayo Bamigbola
Affiliations:
Research,Lymphoma Coalition,Mississauga,Canada
Lorna Warwick
Affiliations:
Management,Lymphoma Coalition,Mississauga,Canada
EHA Library. Dren N. 06/09/21; 324898; EP1177
Natalie Dren
Natalie Dren
Contributions
Abstract
Presentation during EHA2021: All e-poster presentations will be made available as of Friday, June 11, 2021 (09:00 CEST) and will be accessible for on-demand viewing until August 15, 2021 on the Virtual Congress platform.

Abstract: EP1177

Type: E-Poster Presentation

Session title: Quality of life, palliative care, ethics and health economics

Background
Patients with lymphoma face various emotional consequences as a result of their diagnosis and treatment. Progress in providing high-quality care for the psychosocial impacts of lymphoma has not matched the advances in lymphoma detection and treatment. Patients in different life stages may experience different psychosocial issues or varying intensities of psychosocial issues because of their lymphoma.

Aims
Using data from the Lymphoma Coalition (LC) 2020 Global Patient Survey (GPS) on Lymphomas and CLL, this study examines the impact of ageing on the psychosocial experiences of patients with lymphoma.

Methods
Globally, 11,878 respondents including 9,179 patients and 2,699 caregivers took part in the LC 2020 GPS. There were 9,078 patients included in this analysis who self-identified their age. These patients were grouped into five age groups for analysis: 18-29 (n=638), 30-39 (n=1,196), 40-59 (n=3,261), 60-69 (n=2,216), and 70+ (n=1,767).

Demographics of the five age groups were examined, and descriptive analyses for all questions relating to psychosocial issues were performed in IBM SPSS v27.

Results
The five age groups differed significantly (p< 0.001) in all the demographic categories examined. These categories included lymphoma subtype, sex, area of residence, education level, employment status, and household status.

Patients were asked which psychosocial issues they had experienced over the last 12 months because of their lymphoma diagnosis. The oldest age group (70+) reported the lowest prevalence of every psychosocial issue listed (table 1). The oldest age group (70+) also reported the highest prevalence of experiencing no psychosocial issues (‘none’)(39%). In all cases, each psychosocial issue was most prevalent in the youngest age groups (18-29 and 30-39), with prevalence decreasing with increasing age (table 1).


Patients who reported experiencing symptoms of lymphoma/CLL were asked how these symptoms impacted their life, including everyday activities, employment, social life, and relationships (table 1). The lowest prevalence for each of these impact categories was observed in the oldest age group (70+) (table 1). The highest prevalence for each category, except for social life, was observed in the youngest age group (18-29) (table 1).


Patients who reported experiencing treatment-related side effects were asked how these side effects impacted their life, including everyday activities, employment, social life, and relationships (table 1). The lowest prevalence for each of these impact categories was observed in the oldest age group (70+) (table 1). In all cases, the greatest prevalence of each impact was observed in the youngest age groups (18-29 and 30-39), with the prevalence of each issue decreasing with increasing age (table 1).

Conclusion
This analysis revealed that compared to the mid to oldest patient groups, younger patients with lymphoma are disproportionately affected by psychosocial issues resulting from their disease and treatment. These psychosocial issues can negatively impact quality of life. Psychosocial assessment and intervention should be high priority for all patients with lymphoma; however, younger patients may require additional attention and support. In the future, LC would like to explore how demographic differences may have confounded results.

Keyword(s): Adult, Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Lymphoma, Quality of life

Presentation during EHA2021: All e-poster presentations will be made available as of Friday, June 11, 2021 (09:00 CEST) and will be accessible for on-demand viewing until August 15, 2021 on the Virtual Congress platform.

Abstract: EP1177

Type: E-Poster Presentation

Session title: Quality of life, palliative care, ethics and health economics

Background
Patients with lymphoma face various emotional consequences as a result of their diagnosis and treatment. Progress in providing high-quality care for the psychosocial impacts of lymphoma has not matched the advances in lymphoma detection and treatment. Patients in different life stages may experience different psychosocial issues or varying intensities of psychosocial issues because of their lymphoma.

Aims
Using data from the Lymphoma Coalition (LC) 2020 Global Patient Survey (GPS) on Lymphomas and CLL, this study examines the impact of ageing on the psychosocial experiences of patients with lymphoma.

Methods
Globally, 11,878 respondents including 9,179 patients and 2,699 caregivers took part in the LC 2020 GPS. There were 9,078 patients included in this analysis who self-identified their age. These patients were grouped into five age groups for analysis: 18-29 (n=638), 30-39 (n=1,196), 40-59 (n=3,261), 60-69 (n=2,216), and 70+ (n=1,767).

Demographics of the five age groups were examined, and descriptive analyses for all questions relating to psychosocial issues were performed in IBM SPSS v27.

Results
The five age groups differed significantly (p< 0.001) in all the demographic categories examined. These categories included lymphoma subtype, sex, area of residence, education level, employment status, and household status.

Patients were asked which psychosocial issues they had experienced over the last 12 months because of their lymphoma diagnosis. The oldest age group (70+) reported the lowest prevalence of every psychosocial issue listed (table 1). The oldest age group (70+) also reported the highest prevalence of experiencing no psychosocial issues (‘none’)(39%). In all cases, each psychosocial issue was most prevalent in the youngest age groups (18-29 and 30-39), with prevalence decreasing with increasing age (table 1).


Patients who reported experiencing symptoms of lymphoma/CLL were asked how these symptoms impacted their life, including everyday activities, employment, social life, and relationships (table 1). The lowest prevalence for each of these impact categories was observed in the oldest age group (70+) (table 1). The highest prevalence for each category, except for social life, was observed in the youngest age group (18-29) (table 1).


Patients who reported experiencing treatment-related side effects were asked how these side effects impacted their life, including everyday activities, employment, social life, and relationships (table 1). The lowest prevalence for each of these impact categories was observed in the oldest age group (70+) (table 1). In all cases, the greatest prevalence of each impact was observed in the youngest age groups (18-29 and 30-39), with the prevalence of each issue decreasing with increasing age (table 1).

Conclusion
This analysis revealed that compared to the mid to oldest patient groups, younger patients with lymphoma are disproportionately affected by psychosocial issues resulting from their disease and treatment. These psychosocial issues can negatively impact quality of life. Psychosocial assessment and intervention should be high priority for all patients with lymphoma; however, younger patients may require additional attention and support. In the future, LC would like to explore how demographic differences may have confounded results.

Keyword(s): Adult, Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Lymphoma, Quality of life

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