MUTANT IDH1 INHIBITOR IVOSIDENIB (AG-120) IN COMBINATION WITH AZACITIDINE FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA
Author(s): ,
Courtney D. DiNardo
Affiliations:
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center,Houston,United States
,
Anthony S. Stein
Affiliations:
City of Hope Medical Center,Duarte,United States
,
Eytan M. Stein
Affiliations:
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center,New York,United States
,
Amir T. Fathi
Affiliations:
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center,Boston,United States
,
Olga Frankfurt
Affiliations:
Northwestern University,Chicago,United States
,
Andre C. Schuh
Affiliations:
Princess Margaret Cancer Centre,Toronto,Canada
,
Hartmut Döhner
Affiliations:
Ulm University Hospital,Ulm,Germany
,
Giovanni Martinelli
Affiliations:
Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS,Meldola,Italy
,
Prapti A. Patel
Affiliations:
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center,Dallas,United States
,
Emmanuel Raffoux
Affiliations:
Hôpital Saint-Louis,Paris,France
,
Peter Tan
Affiliations:
Royal Perth Hospital,Perth,Australia
,
Amer Zeidan
Affiliations:
Yale Cancer Center,New Haven,United States
,
Stéphane de Botton
Affiliations:
Institut Gustave Roussy,Villejuif,France
,
Hagop M. Kantarjian
Affiliations:
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center,Houston,United States
,
Richard M. Stone
Affiliations:
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,Boston,United States
,
Du Lam
Affiliations:
Celgene Corp.,Summit,United States
,
Xiwei Wang
Affiliations:
Celgene Corp.,Summit,United States
,
Jing Gong
Affiliations:
Celgene Corp.,Summit,United States
,
Stephanie M. Kapsalis
Affiliations:
Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.,Cambridge,United States
,
Denice Hickman
Affiliations:
Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.,Cambridge,United States
,
Vickie Zhang
Affiliations:
Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.,Cambridge,United States
,
Thomas Winkler
Affiliations:
Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.,Cambridge,United States
,
Bin Wu
Affiliations:
Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.,Cambridge,United States
Paresh Vyas
Affiliations:
University of Oxford,Oxford,United Kingdom
EHA Library. D. DiNardo C. Jun 15, 2019; 266640; PS1023
Courtney D. DiNardo
Courtney D. DiNardo
Contributions
Abstract

Abstract: PS1023

Type: Poster Presentation

Presentation during EHA24: On Saturday, June 15, 2019 from 17:30 - 19:00

Location: Poster area

Background
Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are reported in 6–10% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Ivosidenib (IVO; AG-120) is an oral, potent, targeted inhibitor of mutant IDH1 (mIDH1) that is approved for the treatment of adults with mIDH1 relapsed or refractory AML. In vitro, combination treatment of mIDH1 leukemic cell lines with IVO and azacitidine (AZA) enhanced cellular differentiation and apoptosis.

Aims
We report results from an ongoing phase 1b study of patients with mIDH1 newly diagnosed (ND) AML who were ineligible for intensive treatment, and who received IVO in combination with AZA (NCT02677922).

Methods
Patients received IVO 500 mg once daily continuously, and subcutaneous AZA 75 mg/m2 on Days 1–7 in 28-day cycles. Overall response rate (ORR) comprised complete remission (CR) + CR with incomplete hematologic or platelet recovery (CRi/CRp) + partial remission + morphologic leukemia-free state (MLFS). CR with partial hematologic recovery (CRh) was defined as CR with absolute neutrophil count >0.5 × 109/L (500/μL) and platelets >50 × 109/L (50,000/μL). Exploratory analysis included digital PCR assessment of mIDH1 allele frequency in bone marrow mononuclear cells (≤0.04% sensitivity).

Results
As of Oct 9, 2018, 23 patients had received IVO+AZA (11 men; median age 76 years [range, 61–88]). Median duration of exposure was 11 months (range, 0.3–25.3); 12 patients remained on treatment at data cutoff. All-grade adverse events (AEs) regardless of cause in ≥30% of patients were thrombocytopenia (65%), nausea (61%), diarrhea (57%), anemia (52%), constipation (52%), febrile neutropenia (39%), pyrexia (39%), vomiting (35%), fatigue (35%), hypokalemia (35%), dizziness (35%), insomnia (35%), and neutropenia (30%). AEs of special interest included electrocardiogram (ECG) QT prolonged (26%), IDH differentiation syndrome (17%), and leukocytosis (13%). Grade 3/4 AEs in ≥10% of patients were thrombocytopenia (61%), anemia (44%), febrile neutropenia (39%), neutropenia (26%), sepsis (22%), and ECG QT prolonged (13%). ORR was 78% (n=18), including a CR rate of 57%, a CRi/CRp rate of 13%, and an MLFS rate of 9%. The CR+CRh rate was 70% (n=16). Median time to response was 1.8 months (range, 0.7–3.8) and to CR was 3.5 months (range, 0.8–6.0); median response duration not yet reached. mIDH1 clearance was seen in 10 of 16 patients (63%) with CR/CRh, including 9 of 13 (69%) with CR.

Conclusion
IVO+AZA was well tolerated, and had a safety profile consistent with IVO or AZA monotherapy. All-grade cytopenia-related AEs were infrequent relative to other nonintensive therapies. CR rate and ORR exceeded those of AZA alone (Dombret et al. Blood 2015) and a majority of responders achieved mIDH1 mutation clearance. Based on these findings, a phase 3 double-blind placebo-controlled study of IVO+AZA (AGILE, NCT03173248) is actively enrolling patients.

Session topic: 4. Acute myeloid leukemia - Clinical

Keyword(s): Acute myeloid leukemia, Azacitidine, Targeted therapy

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